Facts about Infant Gas

With decades of experience in providing safe, effective gas relief, trust the experts at Mylicon® to offer insights on infant gas so you can tell what’s ordinary and what’s not.

image
Advice image

Mylicon Moms

Sign up for product news and share tips to help other moms.

Join now
With decades of experience in providing safe, effective gas relief, trust the experts at Mylicon® to offer insights on infant gas so you can tell what’s ordinary and what’s not.

NAME ALL THE REASONS BABIES CRY. WAS INFANT GAS ON YOUR LIST?

They cry when they’re hungry. If their diaper is full. When they’re tired. In the middle of the night. You expected all that. But those times when they’re shrieking like a banshee, fussing about like a fish out of water and turn red as a tomato? That’s a whole other level. There’s no need to panic or lose hope. Something as simple as infant gas might be the cause of the drama.  

HOW TO RECOGNIZE GAS BEFORE IT’S PASSED.

Just because you don’t hear (or smell) any signs of gas, doesn’t mean that it’s not an issue for your baby. Newborn digestive systems are tiny, making them suceptable to the pressure and discomfort created by even the slightest of gas bubbles. Plus, a baby’s digestive tract isn’t fully matured until around six months1 so dealing with excess gas is more difficult until that point. Thus all the tears and fussiness. Look out for signs like these to tell if infant gas might be making your baby cranky:
  • Gas most often shows up soon after feedings
  • Burping and spitting up during or just after feeding can be a sign that your baby gulped down air while feeding – too much air can cause excess gas
  • If your baby is well-rested, fed and has a dry diaper yet continues to squirm, fuss, cry and grunt they may be experiencing gas pains or pressure from bloating
  • In an effort to relieve discomfort, babies with gas will often pull up and pump their legs as if riding a bike or lay in a curled position
  • You hear rumbling, growling noises coming from your baby’s stomach or their tummy feels tight
 

IF IT SEEMS THEY’RE ALWAYS GASSY, THEY PROBABLY ARE.

The average person passes gas between 13-21 times every day.2 When you consider that babies are asleep more than half of the day, you’re likely to notice lot of fussing and, eventually, burps and flatulence during their waking hours.   On top of that, infants often end up with more gas than an average child or adult because they tend to ingest more air through their mouths during feedings, while sucking on a pacifier and when they cry. (link to new “Stop Gas” blog when posted)  

NO LIE: BABIES HAVE IT TOUGH.

Gas can be uncomfortable for anyone. Unfortunately, infants often take it lying down. Literally. Studies have shown it’s faster and easier to evacuate excess gas while standing.3 But an immobile baby spends most of the day on their back. Just one more reason why babies have a more difficult time dealing with gas and can use some extra help to get relief.  

BUT IS IT A PROBLEM?

Chances are what you and your baby are experiencing is completely normal. Like crawling and teething, gassy tummies are just part of natural development. Within a few months, your little one should develop the ability to deal with gas without the crying and fussing. Until then, Mylicon offers gas relief formulas for infants that are safe to use at every feeding. (Up to 12 doses a day. Use as directed.) These formulas gently relieve pressure and make it easier for infants to pass gas. If your baby runs a fever along with gas, refuses to eat or if you’re still just not sure their gas is normal, talk to your pediatrician.
Infirst

© Infirst Healthcare Inc. All rights reserved.

Mylicon is a registered trademark of McNeil Consumer Pharmaceuticals Company.
This site is published by Infirst Healthcare Inc. which is solely responsible for its content.
This website and its contents are intended for USA audiences only.

Questions or comments? Contact us.